Possible Installations

As you may know, in order to have Frontity running you will need to adapt your configuration as it requires to use Node. We strongly recommend what we named "Direct to Frontity" installation as it matches most of user needs, but we are developing new options in case it doesn't fit yours.

Installations

πŸ”œ Coming soon

Frontity possible installations

Direct to Frontity

In this solution, WordPress is used as a headless CMS and we use Frontity to generate and show the final HTML. This means that WordPress is used just for managing the content.

  • Frontity uses the WP API to retrieve content and generate the final HTML.

  • Frontity is also capable to generate AMP pages with the same React code and CSS.

This solution requires a PHP Server for WordPress and a Node Server for Frontity, as well as a new domain for your WordPress site as the main one will be used by Frontity.

βœ… Pros

❌ Cons

Perfect fit for users with free WP.com blogs (myblog.wordpress.com).

Users need to change their WordPress domain.

Fastest server side rendering (no useless WordPress request needed).

A Frontity server is needed.

​

The server side rendering is still slow if the WordPress site is slow, so it may need a cache layer on top.

If you choose this solution, you may want to check our recommendations about selecting a server, your domains and the cache technique at "Decisions you should take".

πŸ”œ Coming soon

PHP Theme Bridge

πŸ›  This installation is still under construction. Feel free to ask any questions you might have.

This is a PHP theme that doesn’t generate any HTML. Instead, it does an HTTP call to the Frontity server to retrieve the HTML and outputs that.

With this solution, you won't need a new domain for your WordPress site, but you will still need a PHP Server for WordPress and a Node Server for Frontity.

βœ… Pros

❌ Cons

Users don’t need to change their WordPress domain.

A Frontity server is needed.

The cache can be done with WordPress plugins, which know when to invalidate it intelligently.

There is more routing involved (it goes to WordPress, then Frontity, then WordPress outputs the HTML).

​

Users must use a cache plugin or it will be very slow.

If you choose this solution, you may want to check our recommendations about selecting a server at "Decisions you should take".

Static Rendered HTML

πŸ›  This installation is still under construction. Feel free to ask any questions you might have.

Users create an HTML file for each possible route at building time. It's like Gatsby or Next.js.

βœ… Pros

❌ Cons

No Frontity server is needed.

You need to generate a new build each time you publish or edit content.

No cache is needed.

A static HTML server is needed.

Server-side rendering is done at building time, so it is like β€œinstant”.

Users need to move their WordPress site to a different domain.

​

Not recommended for big blogs with thousands of posts.

​

Not recommended for blogs that update content frequently.

React-only PHP theme

πŸ›  This installation is still under construction. Feel free to ask any questions you might have.

This is a PHP theme generated by a Frontity command that renders an empty HTML which only contains the scripts to React. It’s basically a Single Page Application.

βœ… Pros

❌ Cons

No Frontity server is needed.

It doesn’t have server side rendering.

Users don’t need to move their WordPress site to a new domain.

No HTML: bad for SEO.

No cache is needed.

Bad for First meaningful paint of Lighthouse (bad for SEO).

​

Readers don’t see anything until React has finished loading: bad user experience.

​

The first React load is slower because it needs to do all the API calls.

Static HTML PHP Theme

πŸ›  This installation is still under construction. Feel free to ask any questions you might have.

This is a PHP theme generated by a Frontity command but instead of rendering an empty HTML it includes an HTML file for each possible route.

βœ… Pros

❌ Cons

No Frontity server is needed.

You need to generate a new build each time you publish or edit content.

Users don’t need to move their WordPress to a new domain.

Not recommended for big blogs with thousands of posts.

No cache is needed.

Not recommended for blogs that update content frequently.

A static HTML server is not needed.

​

​

Still any doubts? Ask the community! We are here to help 😊